Bridging the Divide: Understanding and Implementing Access to the Internet as a Human Right

  • Michael Karanicolas Centre for Law and Democracy
Keywords: Access, Internet, Development, Human Rights, Law

Abstract

Over the past decades the Internet has become increasingly central to the actualisation of fundamental human rights. Consequently, there is a growing body of legislation and jurisprudence recognising access to the Internet itself as a human right. This paper explores the justification and nature of the claim that the Internet is a human right, before considering the implications of this understanding to efforts to expand access. This paper goes on to consider challenges to expanding access in the Canadian and international contexts, particularly with regard to social issues that limit user demand.

Author Biography

Michael Karanicolas, Centre for Law and Democracy
Michael Karanicolas is the Legal Officer for the Centre for Law and Democracy in Halifax, Canada. He can be reached at michael@law-democracy.org.
Published
2013-12-22
How to Cite
Karanicolas, M. (2013). Bridging the Divide: Understanding and Implementing Access to the Internet as a Human Right. The Journal of Community Informatics, 10(2). Retrieved from http://www.ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/990